Ladue High School's student news site

Ladue Publications

Ladue High School's student news site

Ladue Publications

Ladue High School's student news site

Ladue Publications

Physical education courses should be optional for student athletes

The+freshman+P.E.+class+prepares+for+a+game+of+flag+football+at+Ladue+Horton+Watkins+High+School+Sept.+18.+After+participating+in+a+class+warm+up%2C+students+grabbed+their+flags+and+got+in+position+for+the+game+that+awaited+them.+%0A
Mason Eastman
The freshman P.E. class prepares for a game of flag football at Ladue Horton Watkins High School Sept. 18. After participating in a class warm up, students grabbed their flags and got in position for the game that awaited them.

I love physical education (P.E.): I really do. No one can convince me that walking the track while gossiping with your friends for 90 minutes is not an enjoyable way to spend a class period. However, when it’s 6:30 that night, and I leave for practice knowing I won’t return till 9 p.m, I begin to ponder P.E. ‘s importance to student athletes. The sole purpose of P.E. is to ensure all students maintain good physical health, yet many students choose to achieve this in ways other than a novice game of flag football at school. 

One of the biggest struggles student-athletes face is time management. Balancing rigorous practice and game schedules while still maintaining good grades is a daunting task. Because of this, students may choose to opt out of playing a high school sport in fear of biting off more than they can chew. However, those who do choose to tackle this challenge could be faced with burnout in both their academic and athletic carrears. It can be very difficult to remain passionate about something that drains you mentally and physically. 

Rather than making P.E. a mandatory credit, Ladue should implement a system in which student-athletes are allowed to choose whether they want to participate in a P.E. course or take a study hall period. Because most sports practices take place after school, student athletes’ study and homework time would be reduced. Implementing this option would help student-athletes maintain their academic standing because of the extra study time, while also participating in sports. This system would benefit both athletes and nonathletes because it wouldn’t prevent students who don’t play sports from receiving physical education, it would just support those students who did. 

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Mason Eastman
Mason Eastman, Staff
Sophomore Mason Eastman is a writer on Panorama, and this is her first year staff. Mason likes to spend her time playing soccer and hanging out with friends.
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