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Ladue Publications

Ladue High School's student news site

Ladue Publications

Ladue High School's student news site

Ladue Publications

Overused Remakes

Producers need to stop remaking movies so early
Overused+Remakes
Josh Devine

A car is meant to last at least 12 years, and a house is built to last over 100 years, but stories are meant to last the readers a lifetime. The timeless stories we watch growing up, such as Harry Potter or Percy Jackson, are journeys so memorable that they have become engraved in our minds. Stories as iconic as these are meant to last forever, but movie production companies are continuously  remaking the same stories over and over, instead of letting them thrive in their original glory. Movie companies should stop remaking films just because they have a popular fanbase, and leave the stories in their original creation.

When I was first informed of the news that the Harry Potter movies would be getting a reboot in the form of a television series, I was excited. As a fan of the famous stories, I was more than ready to become immersed into the Harry Potter world, like I had been countless times while watching the original movies. However, I was disappointed that big time producers thought that these films couldn’t stand on their own, and needed a new refresh. The final film “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part Two” came out just 13 years ago. I see no reason for such amazing and magical films to be remade so early on after their original release. 

Remaking movies so soon after their release takes away the magic from them, turning them into a piece of comparative art against each other. This can be seen after the release of the new Percy Jackson series. Instead of fans getting excited over the stories that they loved from books, every at home fan suddenly turned into an educated film critic. Every piece of media and review about each episode of the new television Percy Jackson series included side-by-side comparison of the original movies with the new remakes. Instead of living in the stories and getting excited to be re-immersed into a mythical world, fans were upset over a small detail being excluded or one adaptation being different from the other.

Movies are meant to grow and get better with age, and create nostalgia. Nostalgia is a feeling that brings people back to the movies and stories that they grew up on. However, by remaking movies and reusing their stories over and over again, this nostalgia goes away and views are left bored and unexcited for new films. Production companies need to stop remaking movies, and instead focus on creating new stories and films.

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About the Contributor
Josh Devine, Staff
Sophomore Josh Devine is a staffer on Panorama. This is his first year on staff. Josh enjoys skiing and traveling.

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